Superbowl delamed

What’s an American football fan to do the Sunday after the championship games? Twiddle his thumbs, that’s what. Tell me, was it always the case that the NFL waited two weeks to stage the Superbowl? This delay is lame and seems designed only to squeeze every corporate ounce out of the event. And that’s what it is, an “event.” I like football (go Bengals!), but the Superbowl just seems so, well, anticlimactic.

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “Superbowl delamed

  1. According to an old < HREF="http://www.usatoday.com/sports/football/super/2003-01-20-cover-crunchtime_x.htm" REL="nofollow"><>USA Today<><> article, “The six Super Bowls after a one-week break were won by an average of 9.0 points. The 30 games played after two weeks were won by an average of 17.3 points. Ten were decided by 21-plus points. Coincidence, or cause and effect?” In other words, no, there wasn’t always a two-week gap. But most of the time, there has been one.Moreover, it seems that the shorter break has led to closer games. the argument is that with 2 weeks, the better team has more time to maximize its superiority and exploit mis-matches.It used to bother me some, but now I don’t mind it– it stretches the season just a little but longer. You want to talk about thumb-twiddling? Just wait for that gap between the Super Bowl and the start of the Baseball season. <>THAT’S<> when you twiddle your thumbs!

    Like

  2. fellas, some people fill the void with the march madness thing a bit during the “off time” (college basketball – yawn). I also noticed that NBC is televising NBA games on Sunday (bleck!), and of course you have the ultimate American “sport” on Fox: NASCAR (bleck bleck!). Then there’s golf… I’m blown away there’s even a TV market for it.<>anticlimactic<>Hell yeah, man. The last good one I remember was in 2000, I think, when the Titans lost it on the 1 yard line as the clock expired in the 4th.I like the close games. The best game of the playoffs, and I’m not just saying this as a Colts fan, was the Colts game — right down to the wire.

    Like

  3. David J– who watches college basketball? Besides millions of college students, their parent, alumni, and residents of college towns? And other basketball sports fans? OK, so that’s a lot. But I never much got into it (though when I was an undergrad, the Quakers did win their first round game!), so perhaps that’s why I blocked it out.As for pro basketball, ugh. I haven’t been interested since the mid-90’s, and even then, I turned it on only during the finals. And given that their numbers are down in general, I’m not the only one with waning interests…

    Like

  4. <>I’m not the only one with waning interests<>Totally. The NBA is lame, lame. I haven’t taken it seriously for about 5 or 6 years myself. Putting a ball through the hoop when you’re standing right under the stupid thing — lame. Chucking an oblate spheroid 180 feet to a dude who’s running a slant pattern as fast as he can — try that in your backyard, it’s impossible. (American) football just has a magnetism to it that the others don’t have for lots of folks.Low-grade basketball is the bread and butter here in Kentucky. It’s sickening. The local newscasters start by talking about UK, then go on to high school basketball (mens and womens), and then — get this — they even show you highlights and commentary from junior high games as well. There’s just no market for professional anything here because UK sucks up the market.So lancer, why do you think that basketball is waning, man?

    Like

  5. DJ–Good question!! It’s part of a larger question I often think about: what are the factors behind a sport’s success in a region/country/culture?I refuse to attribute ruel changes to such things. Hockey isn’t going to leap in populatiry because the Rangers beat the Caps 4-3 instead of 2-1.I think larger cultural trends play a huge part, but it’s probably even more complex than that.I grew up with Bird and Magic and Jordan was big when I was in college in Philadelphia (a good NBA city). I recall fondly watching the NBA finals with The Guys on a warm summer night.What’s changed? No more Magic and Bird, or Jordan, for that matter. Why aren’t newer guys– e.g. Shaq, Duncan, Iverson, etc., as compelling? Has the ‘ghetto-ization’ of the sport turned off white-bread folks like me? Or is it simply that the growth in other sports– golf, NASCAR, soccer, poker (!)– plus other entertainment avenues (e.g. internet, Xbox, etc.) simply siphoned off casual fans, leaving the hard core types?I’m still thinking about it, but those are some things I’m tossing around…

    Like

Comments are closed.